2009 modernization market predication from Geoff Baker of Transoft

In response to my request for Application Modernization predictions for 2009, Geoff Baker of Transoft submitted the following message of both economic doom and migration project hope:

January 2009 Geoff Baker of Transoft (www.transoft.com) writes:
 
In 2009, global businesses are facing a refinancing timebomb as they renew or restructure existing loan facilities and the paucity of available debt financing will squeeze even blue chip companies. What will this backdrop mean for application modernization and migration strategies and vendor companies, such as Transoft? In summary, the large COTS legacy replacement projects are less likely, so migration will continue to be (more) attractive.  There will be more companies risking the ‘do nothing’ option. But the best businesses – small and large - will continue to require business improvement and for modernization and migration vendors there will continue to be project work in 2009, but the projects must be well justified, generally fixed price and are likely to be somewhat smaller than in the past with some implemented iteratively, based on achieving each milestone in turn. Such projects might include replacing legacy data sources with RDBMS, Business Intelligence or implementing a legacy SOA strategy to progressively provide core business services to new internally facilities and external partners. Transoft with its rich portfolio of modernization products and migration tools together with 20+ years experience is well placed to take advantage of this new darker dawn.
 

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  • 1/25/2009 9:56 AM Vaughan Merlyn wrote:
    One capability this prediction seems to ignore is SaaS (and the broader universe of Cloud Computing). Many of the CIOs I talk to are suddenly getting much more serious about these possibilities, some running experiments to learn their viability, and most being delighted in what they are finding. I believe, for some applications, these new approaches will create a potential 'fast path' to renewal.
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